Two statements by Peter Drucker 

In May 3’s Fortune CEO Daily (http://www.fortune.com/2017/05/02/ceo-daily-tuesday-2nd-may/) Alan Murray quotes two statements by Peter Drucker that I want to re-quote here, because I find them of high relevance in an environment where CSR is too often merely seen as an important marketing tool to redirect attention from otherwise not so responsible business practices: 

“It is management’s public responsibility to make whatever is genuinely in the public good become the enterprise’s own self-interest.”

“The proper social responsibility of business is to tame the dragon – that is, to turn a social problem into economic opportunity and economic benefit, into productive capacity, into human competence, into well-paid jobs, and into wealth.” 

I think in a nutshell these two beautiful quotes actually provide essential strategic guidance for any entrepreneurial activity in the context of sustainable management. 

Leadership, personal development and sustainability

Nowadays, with the influence of emotional intelligence within a leadership and management context being explored so widely and explained so well, it makes it much easier to introduce the “body” into serious discussions on CSR and sustainability. The way you treat your own body, the way you move and the way you use your body as a sensory organ does not only shed light on a person’s behavior patterns in general. It also reveals a person’s emotional maturity.

What do you feed and nourish your body with? How much junk food, junk drinks and junk mental and emotional contents (for instance via print media, TV, digital contents, etc.) do you pile on your body on a daily basis? The mental content a person consumes regularly has a very clear physiological impact that then again results in specific emotional and mental patterns. The degree of alertness a person shows in this regard will be reflected in the alertness in his or her communication and interactions with others.

What is the content you confront your employees with on a daily basis with regards to the mental and emotional aspects, for instance moods or the way you sense and deal with expectations? Do I treat my body; do I treat myself in a sustainable way? How far does a company actually push its CSR and sustainability endeavors?

Three recent surveys regarding sustainability:

Here are three surveys regarding sustainability I recently read that I find worth sharing:

Berns, Maurice, Andrew Townend, Zayna Khayat and others. “The Business of Sustainability: Imperatives, Advantages, and Actions.” Strategic Planning Publications. Boston, MA, USA: The Boston Consulting Group, September 2009. (http://www.bcg.com/expertise_impact/capabilities/strategy/strategic_planning/publicationdetails.aspx?id=tcm:12-29484)

Bonini, Sheila, Stephan Görner, Alissa Jones. “How Companies Manage Sustainability.” McKinsey Global Survey Results. McKinsey & Company, 2010. (https://www.mckinseyquarterly.com/How_companies_manage_sustainability_McKinsey_Global_Survey_results__2558)

Riddleberger, Eric and Jeffrey Hittner. “Leading a Sustainable Enterprise: Leveraging Insight and Information to Act.” IBM Institute for Business Value Study. Somers, NY, USA: IBM Global Services, June 2009. (http://www-935.ibm.com/services/us/gbs/bus/html/csr-study-2009.html)

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“Corporate Responsibility – Responding to the Global Challenge” post on corporate citizenship:

“The Global Compact and the Challenges of Corporate Citizenship”

By Gavin Power
(http://www.responsiblepractice.com/english/standards/globalcompact/)
I got knowledge of this post through a recommendation by Márcio Tobias from Linkedin’s “Ethics – Ethical Professionals” group and I think it is information worth spreading.

howsmatter.com post on “social detachment”

Very interesting post on the cost of “social detachment”!

“Business’ Increasing Proximity Risk – A look at the cost of social detachment”

Read the following quote from that post:
“A fellow board member of sustainability organization Business for Social Responsibility (BSR) recently talked about this phenomenon known as ‘social detachment.’ I like the terminology. The price of being too distant and too removed from your community and your customers has recently increased. Better understanding of how your product and services truly impact your community is perhaps one of the best forms of brand insurance a company can buy.
BSR provides such insurance to many of large Fortune 500 companies. What’s encouraging is that it has found that despite the economic crisis, more and more organizations have realized that while many costs need to be cut, the social responsibility activities of companies should be expanded. Many companies buy traditional insurance — and it may make sense to do so — but I would argue that buying social insurance by getting closer to the end-users of your products is even more important. A building or a machine can be replaced, but many of the companies, and perhaps countries, that got lost in translation in this crisis will most likely never stand up again. At least not any time soon.”

By Mats Lederhausen, March 16, 2009
(http://www.howsmatter.com/business-increasing-proximity-risk/)

howsmatter.com post on "social detachment"

Very interesting post on the cost of “social detachment”!

“Business’ Increasing Proximity Risk – A look at the cost of social detachment”

Read the following quote from that post:
“A fellow board member of sustainability organization Business for Social Responsibility (BSR) recently talked about this phenomenon known as ‘social detachment.’ I like the terminology. The price of being too distant and too removed from your community and your customers has recently increased. Better understanding of how your product and services truly impact your community is perhaps one of the best forms of brand insurance a company can buy.
BSR provides such insurance to many of large Fortune 500 companies. What’s encouraging is that it has found that despite the economic crisis, more and more organizations have realized that while many costs need to be cut, the social responsibility activities of companies should be expanded. Many companies buy traditional insurance — and it may make sense to do so — but I would argue that buying social insurance by getting closer to the end-users of your products is even more important. A building or a machine can be replaced, but many of the companies, and perhaps countries, that got lost in translation in this crisis will most likely never stand up again. At least not any time soon.”

By Mats Lederhausen, March 16, 2009
(http://www.howsmatter.com/business-increasing-proximity-risk/)